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HR Superstars
HR Superstars

Episode 6 · 1 year ago

Change Leaders: How HR Supports WFH Employees w/ Jennifer Christie

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Before COVID, hardly anyone opted to work full-time remotely. After COVID, hardly anyone wants to go back to the office full time.

COVID changed HR forever, period. How do we support our people now?

In this episode, we interview Jennifer Christie, Chief HR Officer at Twitter, about how the pandemic accelerated their decentralization plans and helped grow an even stronger culture.

What we talked about:

-Practical strategies for supporting remote employees

-How the use of office space has changed forever

-Leading change with Why, not what, when, or how

-Twitter’s diversity and inclusion gains and goals

For the entire interview, subscribe to HR Superstars on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, or Stitcher. Or, tune in on our website.

Listening on a desktop & can’t see the links? Just search for HR Superstars in your favorite podcast player.

It's EASURE. It should create a level playing field. When everybody's remote rights, it really is. Everyone has a shared experience. You're listening to HR superstars, a podcast from one thousand five five that highlights stories from the front lines of HR and people offs. Each episode will showcase fascinating conversations with leaders offering their unique experiences and advice for building an extraordinary company and culture. Let's get into the show. Hey everyone, please enjoy our interview with Jennifer Christie, vp of people and C HR row at twitter. She leads the global people team and works with the Executive Management Team, as well as the board of directors, to support the strategic direction of the company. Enjoy. Welcome, Jennifer. Great to be here. Thanks for having me. I'm so curious with the recent announcement under covid that twitter was going to be working from home forever, essentially, or allowing people who can do that. That's sounded like it made a lot of headlines that it was a really bold move. I'm really curious what went into that decision and and how's it going now that we're in a couple of months? I would say that it definitely got a lot of headlines and a lot of splash, but internally it was something that we've been talking about for the last couple of years. So a couple of years ago, as part of this broad our work for strategy, we look forward and we recognize that there's definitely a growing number of people who want to work remotely or want flexible option. I mean you see coming now coming online. They're fully remote. You know, they bypassed the office. You know, from day one we saw that and we said, listen, if we don't start kind of shifting and being you know, we're very office centric. We started out very office centric, like a lot of Silkin valley offices are, and said, if we want to be able to attract and retain this growing employee base that that is building very, very rapidly, we got to start shifting our culture. We've got to start shifting how we work if we're going to be more inclusive of that type of work style. And so we've been building on this for a while. So when we shifted in March to work working full time because of covid there are a lot of things we still need to work on, but it was more of a natural shift because it accelerated us into a downopath that we were already on. And this concept of, you know, as people think about returning back to work and do people want to come back to offices, you know, given everything that that's going on, and help people feel about maybe being in that office environment again. We just reiterated, but you know, we've always had this option for people to raise their hand. It's kind a flexible work program they could either move offices, so change where they work, to keep their job exactly the same as it is, but just go to different city and we facilitated even moves across borders with this program also, you know, people want to work from home full time. We've been able to facilitate that too. So internally it was more of just a reiteration of like, maybe you didn't want to work remotely full time before, but it's still an option for you and if you changed your mind, let us know. It's great. You know, don't know if you know this, but actually fifteen five actually got our start in...

...the twitter building. We worked out of the the runway space above the market there on the corner and San Francisco for a long time. But you know, now we're fully distributed as well. I'm curious. You know, you guys have a beautiful piece of real estate there. So how does that how is that going to change? You're thinking around the physical offices. You know, how we're thinking differently about our physical offices is how they'll be used. You know, we don't see right now that we're going to be a such in a situation where we're going to be fully remote. Before covid we had the majority of our people who worked from an office most of the time. We had a pretty small, single digits percentage of our employee were we're working full time remote and it was funny f about a month into our time, so mid April, after, you know, we said everyone home kind of early March, and in the middle of April we did a pulse survey. We did a survey. We do a number of these. We send out these these surveys just get our hand on the pulse of what's happening with our people. Are they feeling? This one was very targeted to how's it going working from him, like what's working, what's not, you know, just to get a sense of that and we also asked in that survey, what do you want to do post Covid, you know, has this change your idea of work styles? And it was fascinating because we had people who said, pre covid they were mostly in the office. We went down to ten percent of people who said they wanted to be an office full time. Wow, that's amazing. Yeah, then our number of people who wanted to be full time remote tripled. This big growing in the middle, though, just kind of you to see it shifts shift across. was people who want to split their time. They still wanted that connection at some point, whether it's one or four days in the office. They they want to completely give that up. They did really enjoy working from him. And this was, remember, like a month in, where there's a lot of people who still were figuring it out. We're doing another we just launched another survey of the follow up to that. So I'm very eager to see what happens at the end of this month in terms of how people's perceptions and mindset was continued to shift. I suspect that migration will continue to change. But that said, you know, we still see value in our office spaces. Were Very People's organization. We just may use them differently, you know, instead of everyone having a dedicated desk, have more collaboration spaces, more social interaction spaces, so when people come into the officer, doing it for a very specific reason versus just being everyteae. Yeah, that makes sense. Were you surprised by that, that so many people would embrace working from home and actually like it to some degree? I definitely was surprised, especially given where we were in that whole transition, because it is like a month and a half and there are we didn't know how long this was going to last. So we had a lot of people who are kind of waiting it out. They weren't investing, like we had given a productivity budget and a lot of resources to support people working from home that people hadn't quite started taking up yet, because I think there are a lot of people like this is going to end soon, I'm just going to get back in the office us. And the fact this is not a normal remote working situation right. I mean people had their kids at home, schools were starting to close, you couldn't go to restaurant, you...

...could do the normal things that you would do to balance your life. So I thought it was going to be the exact opposite. I thought this was going to take our total decentralization strategy and put it on its head and get us, you know, way farther back and have us to undo a lot of feelings about working from him, and in fact it accelerated us. That's I just I was. I was very surprised. Huh. It's pretty amazing. I'm in this peer group of Fast Growth Sas CEOS, and the thing I was most surprised at in hearing from the other CEOS was how surprisingly easy they found it getting transitioning to actually get work done and how I think only ten percent of those CEOS are saying we're going to keep our offices as they are. Anyone, I was at least right now, is letting them go. Other people are looking to downsize and repurpose space, like you mentioned. But the one theme that keeps coming up is this concern around, or at least they're hearing from their employees, around that emotional connection and that social connection people have and in some cases feeling like the communication is gotten a little bit harsher, especially, I mean we're all under so much stress. I'm curious if you guys are seeing something similar and you know, how do you think about engineering some of the that natural human, emotional social connection that we all need in a world where everyone's working remote. Maybe I'll touch on one thing you said first before I jump into that, around the ability for people to change and pivot into this way of working. HR folks are often the leaders of change and initiatives and all that. We have our process you know, are change curves and you know we take bring people on a journey. We have all these things that we do that mainly focus on the what and the when and the how. And I will tell you what a huge learning for me around all this round change has been nail the why. If you nail the why, you can make change happen very quickly. You know, even the naysayers that are at our company who were like, I don't know that I really think this is going to work. You know, we were doing the flexile work program we said we want you to be safe when the communities you live in to be safe, and that's paramount for us. We need you to go home right. Yeah, yeah, yeah, and so they totally were on board with a why and the what and how and the when didn't matter as much, you know, and so I just think nailing the why, I think is often missed when you think about change. Their question around how do you make sure that we keep those human interactions and especially for a company like twitter that you ask most people what they love the most about twitter, it's the people at twitter. They love their colleagues. Feels like family and even our office spaces are very residential. And so the things that we did take a step back because we said, like the culture and the mental and emotional well being of our people with has been top of mine. For me, those are two things that kind of keep me up at night, along many other things, but those are those are always there who are as a special culture, and a lot of it is around social interaction and engaging with each other. And so we took a step back and said, what are those things that really bring us together that we thought a nail, and one of them was we have monthly one team meetings about every year and...

...a half or so. We bring everyone together physically and we had just done this in Houston in January. We brought everyone around the globe together, you know, just for a week of meeting together, social interaction, you know, aligning on our purpose of mission and goals and all of that and so very social company and the one team meetings that we normally have like every month, we would broadcast out of San Francisco and so can our big Commons area and they, you know, be broadcast around the world and we always thought they were really special, but now that we're doing them a hundred percent virtually, we find out they're more special. Yeah, the people in the room felt great, they could feel the vibe and, you know, they probably were more likely to go to the MIC and ask a question, that kind of thing. But now everyone it's a level playing field. Every scared experience. They have the same access and I will say too, we have we stream it and we were on a hang out. We stream it, but we also have a running slack channel for all of our meetings of people could respond to what's happening and ask questions and it definitely has a lot more transparencing accountability about answering those questions because everyone can see what everyone's asking. We're on the everyone's on that side channel. So there's no cherry picking questions to answer or, you know, like Oh, that came to them, not going to go that. It's you answer everything and people are saying now that they really hope, even when we were migrate back to the office and there's more people in the offices, that we've still run our one teams like that. That's one thing. The other thing I'll mentioned is hack week. So twitter was born out, actually out of the hack week at a previous company where Jack was he hacked his way into imagining twitter. So Hack Week is very cord or our culture, where we come together and teams like take a step away from their day job for a week and really think about what's next, innovation, you know, a problem can they solved together, and that is always been like a big core culture to us. You know, we do that. You know, people come together in the offices and they show their what they do for all week and have these kind of exhibits and all that. But how we're going to do this virtually again, they figured the team figured it out and everyone loved it because there's people could collaborate each other across the globe. They didn't ness have to be in the offices with each other. Everyone got to see everyone's projects and so I think there's things coming out of this that actually drive our culture even more than we could have expected virtually. That's amazing. That's really amazing. You already had this decentralized strategy in place. It feels like in some ways this covid experiment has accelerated some of the you know, the learning around that, and I love the idea around you know, when you have the right why, the what and the win and the how, you know they can kind of fall in the place a little bit easier. It's it. I think it's really the why the olbanizes us. I don't know if you've ever heard Simon Senec or seeing his ted talk. Our book start with why, but he'd be very happy to hear you say that. I'm curious now you know the combination between moving forward with this decentralization and re entry with covid. How do you see those two things playing? You know, and we may not have a real re entry for...

...another year or so, hopefully. How do you see those two things playing? And what does the future look like that you think is going to be different and that you've learned from from this period? That's going to help? Before covid and before we entered in this experiment, you know, we really kind of grouped our work styles into you know, your full time in the office, your full time at home are you might work remotely a few days a week. I think there's another work style that's emerging that's probably going to be pretty big for us, whereas your remote, but you're also engaging in the office and not maybe every week. It's not a regular kind of scheduling Monday, Wednesday, Friday or something like that. It's that social connection. You use the office in a different way where when you want to have social interaction and you want to engage in the colleague you just pop in. At this point we have offices across the globe, so a lot of people, even if they aren't coming into office, of a data of proximity to an office to come in when they want to. Our be challenge is how do we continue to create this level playing field, because that's been the big learning for us and the thing that has been so powerful about everyone being on the same page. We've always been a very heavy video meeting culture. One on one's to be meetings. Everything's a video. We don't do anything on a telephone or over pollycom or any of that kind of stuff, and going into this environment thought, uh, I'll be more of the same, but it's been different because you don't longer have the people in the room in an office. You know, you ten to twenty people in a meeting room and you have a couple of people on the hangout that are trying to speak and aren't heard. They are here in the side of our conversation. That kind of thing. The people are really enjoying this kind of, like I said, level playing field. So as we think about more people and it's easier, should create a level playing field. When everybody's remote right, it's it really is. Everyone has a shared experience. What we're obsessing about right now is when we do re enter, whenever that is, we're gonna have people split between being and office and being at home, and how do we force this level playing field and trying to get very creative about when people come back in. We don't want this to kind of have this feel like we revert back to the way we were, that being in the office is kind of a little better than being at home. More access to people, you have more of the side conversations. You know, there's more leaders there for you to like talk to, and that kind of thing. We just we want to we want to try to engineer an architect a different experience so people don't book compelled the come back in the office if they don't want to because they feel like they're missing out on something. Right. Yeah, that makes a lot of sense. I mean one of the things we learned because we build fifteen five on Zoom and slack in our own product fifteen five, and we ended up having multiple offices pretty pretty soon and had that issue where we had these conference rooms you had like ten people on a camera and then everybody else on their individual laptops. Kind of looking at this grouping, can't quite make out who everybody is. So we adopted a culture that even for our all hands meetings and things, or if you're in a conference, every person has their own laptop at their own video even if we're sharing one Mike, and that...

...way, you know you still have that experience and that's that's one of the things that's worked really well for us in that regard. Well, yeah, it's funny that. I'm glad you said that, because one of the things that we are trying to learn from is companies like yours that are really more remote. First, because there's lots of things we have to think about from a scale perspective and the fact that we didn't start out that way. It's a lot harder to change than to start out that way in some ways, but there are lots of things because learned like that, you know. So we're talking to companies that are full fully remote to say that how do you build relationships, how do you think about career progression? How do you work effectively asynchronously? That is definitely one of the things that we're challenged at, because people are very used to working together like real time and face face, and we found one of the things that I mentioned that survey earlier. One of the things that really popped on that survey was a fact people were dying for being a meeting of all day. They don't had meetings in the counted but now working remotely, suddenly so many more were popping up because just to try to get work done and just to kind of engage with people socially and all of that stuff. It just was starting to bury everybody and so we said, okay, what can we do to fix this and and really started to push a synchronous working and making sure that people didn't feel like everything they did had to be a video and I die and things like that and being very totial. We put some strict meeting guidelines on. If you don't have an agenda, if you don't have a prereddocument, if you don't have these things, you can't call a meeting like that's good. Yeah, that. But yeah, we're learning a lot from companies like yours, who who have nailed this, and there's lots that we can take away about how we keep this level playing field. Yeah, that's great. Curious also about how do you think about because when we were chatting before, you know, I'd learned about camp twitter and you know, kind of this very people first culture you have and camp twitter being this virtual camp for employees kids and resources for parents. How do you think about supporting people in this time? You've mentioned earlier about you know, some of us have have young kids at home. I do, and that's really can be really challenging and there's a lot of fear about whether we're going to be able to send our kids back to school in the fall and what that's going to mean for the working parents. But just in general of supporting people through this really stressful time, whether they have kids or they have roommates or they have, you know, they're doing SDRs, working, you know, from home with their parents or whatnot. How do you think about creating more more support and resilience, and where do you guys choose to invest? I know it's great. It's definitely been top of mine for us and something that very quickly. We recognize that and I think this is going to change HR forever. Honestly, in that we've always had this line of this is where we take care of you, like, obviously we take care of you when you're in the office and there's some things that bleed over into your personal life, which was like health benefits and things like that, but otherwise, when you're not in the office and you're not working, it's kind of that's your deal. This really change that we suddenly were getting very involved in people's personal lives because work and their personal lives were so overlapping...

...and everyone was seeing it, but it was playing out for everybody. You couldn't not know what was what was happening, and so we really started thinking about how do we become more flexible with our benefits? Things easy things like are wellness benefit, you know, was for things like gym membership and things like that that were now closed. We never really allowed this kind of benefits to be used for buying home equipment because I, oh, help equipment, that's kind of your deal. Not so much anymore. Right. People still needed that, that wellness, that outlet, and they weren't able to have it somewhere and they were looking to us. They just say, like, how can we help them? Dependent care of benefits and flexible work schedules, especially for parents who are finding, you know, they really needed much more flexibility and their ability to like do home schooling and to be their kids, and it split their time. And when people are coming into office in the morning and leaving it in the afternoon or evening, it's easy to have this kind of visual cues of like someone's at work, someone's not at work, right, yeah, I oh, they've already left. I'm not going to bother them or you. They haven't got here yet. You know, wait till they get here. And it without that. People were just working seven and no one felt like they had any boundaries and team working agreements together, so people could communicate and be very intentional about like this is when I'm going to be on and this is where I'm going to be off. And the camp twitter thing really came from the fact that after we had really gone through all of our benefits and started to to move them into more of a like how can we expand how they support people's broad our lives, we said, what are we still missing? And the thing it really came out we've done a lot of listening sessions with our twitter parents. We have a business research group twitter parents. We did actually have serve a specifically for parents when we did that survey in April that that was over. On top of that, just say, like, tell us what else of working what's not and there was just a lot of need to help with schooling and just just just the balance of we have so much more in our plates. And so how did hearing from that our Brg about the fact that, okay, it's been a hard to home school, but now the kids are going to be loose all day, you know, without much to do, there's without camps to go to and whatnot, and it was starting to feel really daunting. So we say, the team said, I you know, let's let's figure out how we can help engage the parents kids during this time, because it's all part of the same thing. We're all one company, an we're all one team, and the more that we can help them out, the more we help everybody out. And so the camp twitters an eighth program where we have resources. We've loveag a platform called out school where parents could select different courses for their kids of our tweets, doing things that are live, like cooking classes and yoga classes and even like musical recitals and things like that. And then we have some some things specifically for parents as well around training on home schooling, on e learning and just wellness. You know, how they can find...

...ways to you know, mental health, wellness, emotional wellness, physical wellness, all those things that really help support them. So I just think we're going to be in this business now. The line is moved over. We're just going to be much more involved in the personal lives of our ploy yeah, I love hearing that. You know, I think that. You know, I think they're always is a line at some point, right. But the ethos of our company, while we found it fif five, was on this belief that if we can really create organizations that support our people in thriving in their whole lives, not just their work lies. They're going to be more alive at work, they're going to be contributing more and be able to do their best work, and so I love that that. I'm not happy about the the situation that we're all in because of that, but the you know, the things that's forcing us all to look at, I think are really, really positive. I'm curious, you know, in your bio we said you know, you're both the VP of people and the chief human resources officer, and you also mentioned that you work with both the executive team and the board. You know, I think get a lot of organizations HR people still feel like they don't have enough clout and they're not seen as a real strategic partner to the to the CEO and the board, and it sounds like you are. So I'm curious how does that show up? In what way do you feel that, you know, the board is taking people strategy at that level? I'm curious how that works at twitter. Twitter's is really special in a sense that we come across as a big company, but we are very lean as an ord and relative to other companies, and so there's there's not a lot of hierarchy, there's a lot of accessibility among leadership and all through the ranks. People can email jack bm him or anyone on staff and people can have a voice. So I definitely feel like I've got to seat at the table I'm meeting that does both the senior leadership, but and the board is very accessible and very engaged in things related to people. So every board meeting there's a whole section on people and we go through that and have conversations. We have different topics that we cover with them that are of interest that diversity inclusion is always top of mind for them, so we always do special presentations on that as well. But yeah, it is. I definitely feel like the senior leadership and the board do more than just give lip service to people issues. They recognize what a strategic driver the people team can be and how important our tweets are, and that I didn't need to convince them of that. They already knew that. And our service is about people. Are Companies about people, and so it's easy to be able to drive efforts and have them be right there beside to. Yeah, have you worked in organizations where that wasn't as elevated to that level? I feel like it's less about the organizations is almost like the evolution of HR. HR START OUT AS personnel on this in Silicon Valley, I think HR was definitely like Oh, someone to hire and pay people. You know, there's definitely not seen as as a strategic partner. It was a more administrative function. Even an outside of tech, HR had a slower road to being more of a thought partner...

...and a strategic driver. And I do think, especially in Silicon Valley over the last few years with all the issues that have been coming up that are very employee based, I think there's a lot of companies like oh HR. Yeah, I think we probably need to invest more here and have teams that can help us more. I do also think, you know, being in tech, more than I've seen in other industries, there is a such a reliance on data and analytics and an HR and the HR space that start out as reporting and then they got a little bit into Oh, let's be surveys, but now people analytics is a real thing and I've got a really awesome team and it's the insights that we get in terms of what's happening and are able to track and we were actually very transparent with our data where their transparencies. Definitely something quart or our culture to very similar chart service in terms of like everything is available and it's on there and open and it's transfer. It holds people accountable, it makes sure everyone's on the same page. But the insights that we get from that analytics also gives us a real seat at the table and I will say that there's four core objectives that we are tracking for the next three years. One of them is is about people. It's about arty centralization strategy, which is about diversity and talent and the whole company assigned up for that. So it's not an HR objective that we're reporting out occasionally, like every month, we're getting in front of the senior leadership and we're talking about where we are against this subjective. So it's definitely run center. Now. Yeah, that's great. A love actually dig in a little bit on the diversity and inclusion and you've actually even heard a couple of leaders recently flipping it around and saying that calling it inclusion and diversity and putting more weight on the inclusion piece. I'm curious if the recent events and the protests and this national conversation has that changed your view at all? Or accelerated anything or you know, I'm curious how things evolved in light of that. It's not dissimilar to our the journey we've been on around decentralization in the sense that we've been on this journey around diversity inclusion to includes an adversity. You can, I think you can, flip them. The thing I wouldn't do it separate them. I think right we could always talk about both. I think sometimes the diversity piece, who can be harder in some ways, especially in tech, that then you shouldn't focus on it, and the including in pieces an imperative. So you have to think about it, I think, together, whether you they one of the other first. But we've been on this journey and really trying to take take it to the next level. So when all of the things that happened recently happened, it didn't feel like we were in reaction mode. With our employees, you know, they reporting out quarterly the last couple of years about where we are in our our numbers, in our metrics. We provided dashboard for the company so anybody the company can look at our dashboard and see the diversity by team. So again it's in self reported, but it's you know, we don't hide that. We do and you'll pay audits, Promo audits were transparent about that with our company and so they've...

...seen and we've had these. We have nine amazing business resource groups that have we've been really working closely with to get us the right place. So when all this happened, not to say that we've we've nailed at all. We don't have a you know, stuff to work on. Of course we do. But I felt like the company understood that this wasn't reactive or lip service, that this is part of our journey we've been on and we just gives us even more of a galvanizing rally cry to say, like how can we even accelerate and and move faster? And we know we have a very bold vision for two thousand and twenty five, which is around becoming fifty percent women and our organization and twenty five percent underrepresented, from underrepresented communities, ten percent black, ten percent Latin X and then multiracial and indigenous to round out the rest. So the rest of goals around diversity. We're never going to take our foot off the pedal of that because I don't I don't think you can nail inclusion if you don't have a diverse workforce. I talked about in centralization. That's actually a key driver of it. You know, we thought if we really want our company to reflect our service and we really want to be diverse, we've got to tap into broader talent poles that are more diverse and be more inclusive of where people can join us from. More people they want to live in a different community and be around family. They still want to be part of twitter. Let's be open to that. You know, we don't have to force people to move to San Francisco, and I will tell you I decentralized the recruiting team and our h our business partner team, and now we've got people on the ground who are bringing people into the company who either want to work full time remote or they want to work in one of our offices. They're outside of California, but it's stilly part of twitter and it's definitely helping with our diversity efforts. That's fantastic. Yeah, it's definitely accelerated things for us as well. I think you know, we had we had been having conversations and talking a lot about it and for me it was something that yes, we should do and we should. We should, you know, delegate that to the people team, to the evolution is now I'm embracing that as part of fifteen five core mission and involved directly, and so, you know, I think there's a lot of positive conversations and change happening in that regard. I'm curious, when you set targets like that, how do you guys relate to that and hold the vision while not also, a lot of people have talked about, you know, being careful that you want to engage in token as and and I feel like there's a fine balance in art there. I'm curious how you guys hold that. Yeah, so there's some things I think are really important around that and it's it's around making sure that you really have diverse pipelines and again, effect set about making sure that we are expanding our talent poles, that we are looking at places where we have really diverse talent so we can make sure that the pipelines and the slates that we have for our roles are very diverse. And so that helps us make sure that, as if you have the top of the funnel, you've got lots of diversity and you've got the right practices in place throughout that funnel to land the right candidate, you're going to you're going to have a more diverse workforce and set makes sense making sure that we're trying to root out by us in all stages of the process, making sure that, the way that...

...we do sourcing, we allow the time, because making sure you've got a diverse late sometimes takes more time and getting that buy in or senior leadership, because to say that you know, we're going to take the time to make sure that we've got the right slate before we make a decision on who the right person is. And, as you know, any time a roles open, everyone's like I fill it now, Bill it now, and we even have metrics previously where, you know, our recruiters were scored against time to fill, if you will know how fast they could fill roles. And those are the kind of metrics that don't drive the kind of behaviors at lant diverse slaves because they're they're just trying to get a role filled quickly. So it's the first person that someone need for someone from their own network. versuss like okay, let's just take a step back and make sure that we're really casting a wide net and and really looking at this from a number of lenses, making sure the panels are diverse as well. You know, those are important things, not just not just to make sure you're rooting out bias in an interview process, but also making sure that the people who are coming through have an opportunity to hear different perspectives and under and what twitter really is, and we really value diverse perspectives. We really value the diversity that is our company. People could all walks the twitter people come from all different backgrounds and what makes us special on our culture special, and people get to celebrate that and really be themselves. That's really great. This has been a fantastic conversation. I've got one more question. I'm just curious about because, you know, twitter so public and there's so many conversations that are of national and global interests that are happening all the time and sometimes of challenging conversations. I'm curious, you know, does that way on on your employees in a way that has your job at this organization be different than at a company that doesn't have such a public persona out in the world, and it's interesting, you know, it definitely feels like you're in a bubble. Sometimes it's very hard to predict what's going to be happening on our platform and our service because, again, we're very global and you know, there's a lot of talk here, obviously what's happening United States, but there's lots happening across the globe on our service and it is, I think, just something that the people at twitter are just passionate about our purpose and the service. You know the fact that all employees are really on the service and you know there's lots of different services out there that round platforms out there where people can engage and show what they're working on or, you know, show what they're doing in their personal life. But when your company is a service, that's where all your employees are and so you care share that experience with everybody. So it's just and it's something that we screen for right you know, it's you have to be very adaptable to be a twitter employee because you know you might have your plans but things could change because they unpredictable. The world is unpredictable and things are happening on our service and we're responding to it internally as well, and so I think it's a people who are wired a certain way, who find that exciting and...

...have a resilience around. You know, sometimes that can, you know, thrash you a little bit, but or just again, it just comes back to that this is why we're here and you know, it's kind of what we signed up for and it's exciting for us because, you know, it's it definitely helps you feel that sense of purpose because it's just out there all the time. I will tell you know, the been other places that I've worked where, you know, I'd go home for the holidays or something and hardly anyone would ask you about my job. You know, they's it's nice to see, but you know, there people have feelings about twitter and they're very rolling to share. So it's just people are just it's they oh, you work at twitter and people are proud and you we have swag. Is really big. You know, it's funny. I've never been at a company that where people are more proud to wear their swag. You know, people the company and out for the company are wearing their twitter year and people engage with that. Yeah, there's a lot of pride. They're it's really good. I see your twitter pillow back there. It's great. Well, this has been great, Jennifer. I really appreciate your sharing some time with us and with all of our listeners. I think some some really great gems in there about how you do things in the the future world of work and I love the love to hear how you guys are leading, leading the charge and all that. I appreciate the opportunity and Bilidare. Thank you. Fifteen five is the only evidence based people and performance platform for highly engaged and high performing organizations. Strategic HR leaders in all industries use the platform to win by improving communication, up leveling their managers and increasing company wide engagement. Learn more at Fifteen Fivecom you've been listening to HR superstars stories from the front lines of HR and people offs. Be Sure you never miss an episode by subscribing on your favorite podcast player. If you're listening on Apple PODCASTS, you'd love for you to leave a thoughtful review or give a quick rating by tapping the stars. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time,.

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